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04 Nov

A friend of mine is translating a book on Lincoln written by Karl Marx. Her first installment was a refutation by Marx of the European press’s contention that the assault by the North on the South was not about slavery, but about economic and political power. Of course, one cannot divorce the issue of slavery from either consideration but Marx is either wrong or less than honest when he states that the conflict was “all about slavery,” a matter that…..

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29 Oct

Will someone please tell me, when did facts and truth become hatred, bias, bigotry and (God help us!) “racism?” Or do these negatives obtain only when someone has the temerity to express them? Is saying something politically incorrect a matter of “bias?” And if that is what is believed today, then why is it believed contrary to reason? Western civilization is a white civilization. These are the facts and the truth. There is nothing on earth that has elevated mankind…..

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28 Oct

There was a book written not long ago with the provocative title “Emancipating Slaves; Enslaving Free Men.” I don’t hold with the author’s premise that ending slavery was the only morally acceptable reason for the War of Secession and that protecting the rights and liberties of the Sovereign States and the People somehow constituted an unworthy cause. Nonetheless, the title at least is accurate. The War did indeed emancipate the black slaves while at the same time, enslaving all Americans…..

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27 Oct

In 1935 Lyon Gardiner Tyler (descendent of 10th President John Tyler) wrote: “The old Union was a union of consent; the present Union is one of force. For many years after the war, the South was held as a subject province, and any privileges it now enjoys are mere concessions from its conquerors, not rights inherited from the Constitution. The North, after the war, had in domestic negro rule a whip which England never had over Ireland. To escape from…..

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25 Oct

For those who believe that God is silent in these days of the persecution of Western culture, I have found that He makes his points if only we are listening. My very poor prayer life includes the book “A Year with C. S. Lewis: Daily Readings from His Classic Works.” The reading that falls on the 4th of July is especially relevant. I have wondered in these days of revolt and “resistance” not why the so-called “have-nots” have become the…..

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23 Oct

This is not mine, but nonetheless it deserves to be reprinted. In fact, what is expressed here is quite behind the times and matters have only gotten 1,000% worse! So, with deep appreciation to the original writer, here is an unfortunate obituary as it appeared at the time of its original printing: An Obituary printed in the London Times…..Absolutely Dead Brilliant!! Today we mourn the passing of a beloved old friend, Commonsense, who has been with us for many years……

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15 Oct

Most people are familiar with that terrible and bloody conflict wherein a great deal more died than men and women, as “the Civil War”, but is that name accurate or even appropriate? The definition of a “civil war” is as follows: ~ a war between opposing groups within a nation for the control of that nation. ~ Some recent definitions omit the second phrase referring simply to a “war between opposing groups within a nation”, but that is misleading, even…..

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10 Oct

There was no greater mind in the 19th century than the British philosopher and historian, Lord Acton. Acton, famous for the quote, “Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely,” was not only a great mind, but a great spirit. He rejected tyranny however “patriotic” and refused the spoils of war however enticing. Acton watched closely as the crisis built up between the old Union and the states of the South in America. He was aware of the various…..

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08 Oct

When—or more properly if—people consider the war that began in 1861, they think of it as a “civil war,” but that nomenclature is erroneous as we shall see. Some authors have called it America’s second revolution because, in fact, it resulted in a new nation rather than the nation that had been in existence from 1789 with the ratification of the Constitution. For Abraham Lincoln’s refusal to accept secession had nothing to do with the Constitution or slavery—though he dearly…..

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04 Oct

It has been the drum-beat accusation against those States of the South that seceded in 1861 that they were motivated by the desire to retain chattel slavery. Slavery certainly was an issue and had been one such for many decades, but it was not slavery that motivated the Cotton States to leave the Union. Had slavery been the motive, then the original 13th Amendment to the Constitution — the Corwin Amendment — that had already been introduced into the Congress…..

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